The Buildings

Article Index

Francis Taylor Building

This building, completed in 1957, preserves the memory of Sir Francis Taylor, QC, later Lord Maenan, who had been a Bencher for 46 years when he died in 1951. The southern part of the building incorporates the remaining part of the old Tanfield Court, which took its name from Sir Lawrence Tanfield, Baron of the Exchequer in 1607.

 

Harcourt Buildings

Harcourt Buildings

This range of buildings was designed by Sir Hubert Worthington, RA. Its predecessor was destroyed in 1941. The name commemorates Lord Chancellor Harcourt, during whose Treasurership the original building on the site was erected in 1703.

 


Hare Court

Hare Court

The Court takes its name from Nicholas Hare, who rebuilt part of it in 1567, though his building has been long replaced. He was a Judge, one of the Masters of Requests in 1537, and was created Master of the Rolls in 1553. He died in Chancery Lane in 1557 and was buried in the Temple Church. Another occupant of Hare Court was Lord Chief Justice Jeffreys, who had chambers on the west side of the court when he was at the Bar.

King's Bench Walk

Kings Bench Walk

King's Bench Walk takes its name from the King's Bench Office (the office of the chief clerk or master of the Court of King's Bench) which was sited in the Inner Temple from 1621. The original buildings which lined the inn's eastern boundary with Whitefriars were constructed in the 16th and early 17th century but destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, which was finally brought under control in precincts of the Inner Temple. King's Bench Walk was rebuilt, only to be destroyed in another fire 11 years later, in 1677.
The current buildings vary in date from 1678 to 1948. Numbers 1, 6, 12 and 13 were destroyed in the Blitz and had to be reconstructed, apart from the doorway of No. 1 which was rescued and reinstated. Three fine brick doorways at numbers 3, 4 and 5 have been ascribed to Sir Christopher Wren, although there is no evidence for this.

Littleton Building

Littleton Buildings

Constructed from 1992 to 1994 on the site of the 16th century Alienation Office garden, the Littleton building contains the Inns' newest sets of chambers. It replaces Niblett Hall, which had been erected on the site in 1927 to house a lecture room and meeting place, funded by a legacy from William Charles Niblett of Singapore.

 

Mitre Court Buildings

Mitre Court Buildings

Number one was designed by Sir Robert Smirke, the Inner Temple's surveyor, and erected in 1830. No. 2 is a reproduction made necessary by war damage. Sir Edward Coke had chambers in the building known as Fuller's Rents, which formerly stood on this site.

 

Paper Buildings

Paper Buildings

The first buildings on this site were named Heyward's Buildings. They were built in 1610 of timber, lath and plaster. This method of construction was known as 'paperwork' hence the name Paper Buildings. Numbers 1-3 were rebuilt in 1838 after a fire. They were designed by Sir Robert Smirke, the Inner Temple's surveyor, better known as the architect of the British Museum. However, numbers 4 and 5 were both added in 1848 by Sydney Smirke, Sir Robert Smirke's brother, who followed Sir Robert's design for No. 4 but added a Tudor gothic wing at the south to his own design - which was numbered 5 Paper Buildings.
John Selden's chambers were on the site, the present No 1.

Temple Gardens

Nos. 1 and 2, Temple Gardens are part of the Inner Temple. The building was designed by J P St Aubyn and Edward Manningham Barry, son of Sir Charles Barry, the architect of the Houses of Parliament.